It's My Party

And I’ll take away your phones if I want to. Yes, cellphones are great and can do just about anything these days. A picture taken can be instantly posted to Facebook and you can update your Twitter status via phone as quickly as you can type. These phones can’t, however, tell you when it’s time to put them aside. The New York Times article “Party On, But No Tweets” shares what could become the trend in social media etiquette. The invitation to an exclusive party in New York features this caveat: “Just don’t blog, post pictures to Facebook, or even think about Twittering…” That, said host,author and blogger Michael Malice, allows party attendees to “talk fearlessly in the present.” They needn’t worry that things said, done or seen at this event will show up on Facebook and be forever searchable on Google. Malice elaborated on what brought about his new party policy: “We are fighting against this whole idea that everything people do has to be constantly chronicled. People think that every thought they have, every experience — if it is not captured it is lost.” Instead of being offended by the notion of leaving phones at home, he’s found that attendees are liking this policy. They can enjoy themselves undistracted (except by the usual, like “is there cilantro in my teeth?”) and really focus on what is happening at the party.

Are you hosting an event soon? Celia Chen, the author of an online entertaining magazine, said “It’s the job of the host to educate guests about attire, about start time,” she said. “And now when it comes to social media, it’s also the responsibility of the host to share how you want your guests to act at your party.

3 Comments

  1. Saifocal

    1.”Social media etiquette.” Hmmm….Makes me think of a dude with a computer monitor for a head teaching you how to fold napkins.

    2.”Caveat.” Hmmmm….Makes me think of the name for the little bottle of yellow fish eggs next to the pickled pig’s feet at Pop’s Pitstop between Lewisville and Magnolia.

    3.The quote following the word “caveat.” Uuhhmmmmnn….who cares.

    4.Michael Malice allows party attendees to “talk fearlessly in the present.” Uh..HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA…wait, wait, wait…HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA…Oh, god…that’s good..oh i’m crying…

    5.“We are fighting against this whole idea that everything people do has to be constantly chronicled. People think that every thought they have, every experience — if it is not captured it is lost.” Uuuhhgh….This has to be a joke. The above quote was hilarious because of the salient stupidity of its implicaions, but now this is starting to sound like a guide for the purely superficial, and actually you’re unonciously painting, through your hollow prose, an unmemorable, contemtable portrait of a group of people exisiting on some floating crystal tier. Here’s the simplest way to put it: The tone of the entire article is condescending. Not only because the subject matter is idiotic(‘Let’s all put away our cell phones and have a party, yeah!!’) but because the implications are unfathomable, i.e. the implication that people don’t interact genuinely anymore at parties because of the overbearing influence of “social media.” As soon as a dude comes to my party riding on a hoverboard wearing Star Trek eyeglasses and a talking wristwatch I don’t say,”Oh, you should have left that stuff at home.” I kick his a** down the front steps. There’s an etiquette lesson for ya. As for the article, you and Mr.Malice are getting way ahead of yourselves.

  2. Grace

    You wouldn’t let the guy with the hoverboard stay? I’ve always thought hoverboards were pretty sweet.

  3. Saifocal

    Well we wouldn’t want Mr. Malice to wag his little pinky finger at us.

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